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The NC Civil War & Reconstruction History Center Wants Stories from North Carolinians

August 30, 2018

The North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center wants to collect stories from all North Carolinians. They want to be able to share all experiences of all men, women, and children who lived during the late 19th century. “The stories do not have to be military or war related (although those are welcome) but must be about the lives of North Carolinians who lived any time during the Civil War and or Reconstruction. There’s no tidbit of information too small or too lengthy,” said Cheri Todd Molter, North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction History Center

                                     

 

 

The stories will be edited and made available on the center’s website and could be made available in the center’s exhibit when it opens. “Submitted stories are edited for grammatical errors and or blatant typos [ex. "1962" instead of 1862], then archived in an online collection that is accessible to everyone at North Carolina Civil War & Reconstruction Center
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We do not alter the content of submitted stories. Some of them may eventually be part of an exhibit in the NCCWRHC but considering we're a couple of years from being a brick-and-mortar facility, that won't be occurring soon. The NCCWRHC will be an information institution focused on the social history of NC during the Civil War & Reconstruction era, and this ‘100 Stories from 100 Counties’ project offers an opportunity for people to be a part of the Center by sharing their NC family histories. The resulting collection will record the perspectives of many, documenting the different experiences of North Carolina’s diverse population.”

 

I really am excited about the potential for which collecting stories will mean for North Carolina especially for the time periods during the Civil War and Reconstruction. It may seem to those looking on that this is time period far removed from the present time. In actuality, these time periods are the basis for North Carolinian relations today.

 

 Many people of all colors are stuck in the past having ancestors who experienced war and the aftermath and still not able to come to terms or not able to get past these experiences and move forward. North Carolinians will be able to tell their families own stories. They will also be able to read the experiences that different people had.

 

That is why it is imperative for African Americans are sure to include their stories and others they know. When these stories are looked at from Native Americans, African Americans, and white perspectives in particular, they can be read together as a whole. Healing can start to take place. That is why we need everyone’s story.

 

Dr. Willis B. McLeod, chancellor emeritus of Fayetteville State University said in Willis B. McLeod: Museum needs black voices, “I hope there will be forums all across the region to promote sharing of ideas and stories, especially as they relate to blacks and the post-war era. There is much to be shared about the progress of this population segment following slavery, more so than during the slavery period itself.”

 

“Robin R. Foster volunteered and encouraged others to do the same. She has researched her own past and helped others do likewise. She says older residents in particular often need a hand researching their family’s history. She believes the history center will help in this crucial process, and serve future generations.”

 

“This is vital,” she says. “This will save our children,” Myron B. Pitts:  Civil War center charged to tell the full story.

 

“So, if a person knows something about someone who lived in North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction era and wishes to share it with us, it can be submitted on the NCCWRHC webpage Share A Story or mailed it to 824 Branson St., Fayetteville, NC 28305, or contact me at 910.491.0602,” said Cheri Todd Molter.

 

 

 

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